Join me for a symposium: Breath Education: Art, Science & Soul

lung-tree_422-v2Ten years ago, I produced a weekend symposium for Kripalu called “The Future of Breathing.” To celebrate the anniversary of that wonderful event, I’ve put together a lineup of friends and esteemed breathing experts who will join me at The Breathing Project in October.
Event details are below and early discounted registration is now open. There is limited space at this intimate event, so sign up soon! Future e-Sutra posts will feature interviews with all of the presenters.

Saturday & Sunday, October 24–25, 2015, 9:30am – 5:00pm

The Art of Breathing Coordination and the Kinesthetic Voice
with Jessica Wolf & Lynn Martin

The Physiology of Healthy Breathing
with Dr. Robert Fried

An Embodied Inquiry into Internal Respiration
with Amy Matthews

Essentials of Diaphragmatic Biomechanics
with Leslie Kaminoff

IS THIS SYMPOSIUM FOR YOU?

  • Do you teach or coach voice, acting, yoga, movement or fitness?
  • Do you work in a therapeutic context as a bodyworker, physical therapist, respiratory therapist or trauma therapist?
  • Do you engage with breathing as part of your therapeutic, teaching or personal practice?
  • Are you interested in what’s going on in related fields and modalities on the topic of breath?
  • Are you curious about where flawed assumptions, inaccurate anatomy and limited perspectives might be affecting your choices?

Join us for a special weekend symposium on breath education where we’ll dive into an expansive and inclusive inquiry into working with people and their breath. Leslie Kaminoff has gathered fellow practitioners and innovators from multiple disciplines who, like himself, are deeply engaged in questions around breathing and embodiment. Each presenter will present and share about what they’re curious and passionate about in the realm of breathing. The weekend will include lecture, interactive sessions, experiential learning, movement explorations and opportunities for Q&A.

The Art of Breathing Coordination and the Kinesthetic Voice
with Jessica Wolf & Lynn Martin

Join Jessica and Lynn as they co-present the following topics:

  • Introduction to Breathing Coordination
  • Animated film created by Jessica Wolf
  • Common misconceptions about breathing
  • Guided practices to enhance awareness of body, breath and voice
  • Development of kinesthetic voice related practices

lynn-martinLynn Martin teaches functional anatomy, Ideokinesis and Breathing Coordination at New York University, in the Tisch Dance Department, Tisch School of the Arts. Lynn has studied functional anatomy and Ideokinesis extensively with Irene Dowd, who teaches at The Juilliard School and who studied there with Dr. Lulu Sweigard.

For many years, Lynn Martin also studied Breathing Coordination with Carl Stough. As a member of the Board of Directors, she worked with The Stough Institute on special educational projects and was Associate Producer of a documentary video, Breathing: The Source of Life.

Her background also includes studies in AfroCaribbean music and dance with Montego Joe, Pamela Patrick, Pat Hall, Jean-Léon Destiné and Serge St. Juste. She studied voice with Conrad L. Osborne and has sung much of the great choral-orchestral repertoire with The Cecilia Chorus of N.Y. at Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center.

A summa cum laude graduate of Fordham University, Lynn has also taught at the Laban/Bartenieff Institute of Movement Studies, the Westchester Conservatory of Music, Brooklyn College, the National Association of Teachers of Singing and the Alvin Ailey American Dance Center. She maintains a private practice in Ideokinesis and Breathing Coordination and teaches workshops in New York City and Switzerland.

jessica-wolfJessica Wolf, M.AmSAT, is an internationally recognized teacher of the Alexander Technique. She completed her training at the American Center for the Alexander Technique in 1977 and is one of the few Alexander professionals who have been teaching for more than 35 years. Throughout her career, she has explored and conducted research in respiratory function.

In 1998, Jessica established the Alexander Technique program at Yale School of Drama, where she now holds the position of Associate Professor. In 2002, she became the founder and director of the first post-graduate training program for Alexander teachers in “Jessica Wolf’s Art of Breathing.” She has certified 60 Alexander teachers around the world. Other faculty appointments include the Aspen Music Festival, The Juilliard School, SUNY Purchase, Circle in the Square Theater School, Hunter College, Sarah Lawrence College, and the Verbier Music Festival.

Jessica created the first three-dimensional animated film of the respiratory system and published Jessica Wolf’s Art of Breathing: Collected Articles in 2013. She coaches many performing artists who appear on and off Broadway, as well as in film and television. Jessica travels extensively giving workshops to performers and health care providers.

The Physiology of Healthy Breathing
with Dr. Robert Fried

Dr. Fried will help us to define healthy breathing in terms of its physiological characteristics. He will explain and demonstrate the basic instrumentation for monitoring the measurable parameters of lung and blood gases, and heart rate variability. With the insights provided by such monitoring, Dr. Fried will show how it’s possible to identify common patterns of breathing that could adversely alter respiratory function, and reveal the adverse consequences of abnormal lung and blood gases on a variety of physical conditions ranging from heart and kidney ailments to anxiety and hypertension.

robert-friedRobert Fried, Ph.D., is Emeritus Professor, Doctoral Faculty in Behavioral Neuroscience, City University of New York (CUNY) and Emeritus, American Physiology Society (APS) (Cardiovascular and Respiration Div.), and world-renowned expert in the treatment of stress and anxiety.

He is the author of The Arginine SolutionThe Hyperventilation Syndrome, and The Breath Connection, and is former Director of the Stress and Biofeedback Clinic of the Ellis Institute for Rational Emotive Therapy in New York City, where he lives.

An Embodied Inquiry into Internal Respiration
with Amy Matthews

Amy will explore the movement of the breath after it enters the lungs, as it travels through blood to its final destination in the cells. This journey of internal respiration can be explored in relationship to any pattern of external breathing.

Embodying the processes of internal respiration can be a way to expand the experience of breathing from the landmarks of external respiration (thorax, lungs, ribcage and diaphragm) into an experience of breathing in every tissue of our body. We can also use this full body experience of our breath as a foundation for the exploration of a wide variety of specific approaches to breathing, and as a way to ground and orient our sense of self.

amy-matthewsAmy Matthews, CMA, IDME, BMC Teacher, RSMT/RSME has been teaching movement since 1994. She is a Certified Laban Movement Analyst, a Body-Mind Centering® Teacher, an Infant Developmental Movement Educator, and a yoga therapist and yoga teacher.

Amy co-authored with Leslie Kaminoff the best-selling book Yoga Anatomy, and together Amy and Leslie co-direct The Breathing Project, a non-profit educational institution in NYC.

Amy directs the BMC® & Yoga programs in NYC and Portland, OR for the School for Body-Mind Centering, and was on the faculty of the Laban/Bartenieff Institute of Movement Studies for 10 years. She teaches embodied anatomy and movement in the USA and internationally.

Essentials of Diaphragmatic Biomechanics
with Leslie Kaminoff

Leslie will provide an in-depth look at the structure and function of the diaphragm from a unique perspective – its oft-neglected role as a muscle of postural support. With so much popular attention being paid to the concept of “core support,” there is actually a dearth of well-defined, functional definitions of “core” that take into account the enormously powerful role the diaphragm plays in modulating our relationship to gravity. Through audio-visual presentations, kinesthetic and experiential exploration, and dynamic interaction, Leslie will lead participants in a transformative journey into their breathing, thinking bodies.

leslie-kaminoffLeslie Kaminoff is a yoga educator inspired by the tradition of T.K.V. Desikachar. For over three decades he has led workshops and developed specialized education in the fields of yoga, breath anatomy and bodywork. His approach to teaching combines intellectual rigor, spontaneity and humor, and is always evolving.

Leslie is the founder of The Breathing Project, a New York City based educational non-profit dedicated to teaching individualized, breath-centered yoga. His unique year-long yoga anatomy courses are now available online at yogaanatomy.net. He is the co-author, with Amy Matthews, of the best-selling book Yoga Anatomy.

SCHEDULE

Saturday & Sunday
October 24 – 25, 2015
9:30am – 5:00pm

LOCATION

The Breathing Project
15 West 26th Street, 10th Floor
New York, NY 10010
Directions

REGISTRATION

$375 early price/$350 TBP Members before Sep 12
$425 full price/$400 TBP Members

Email us at  with questions or for more info.




*  *  *

Cancellation Policies

  • Up to 2 weeks before – REFUND. Deposit will be refunded, minus a $30 processing fee.
  • Up to 7 days before – CREDIT. Deposit minus a $30 processing fee may be transferred to another workshop or course at The Breathing Project.
  • Less than 7 days before – No refunds or credits.
  • Transfer between in-person and online courses is not allowed.
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"Singing from the Diaphragm" – An open letter to the world of voice training

Leslie works with Della on diaphragm release.I’ve had the opportunity lately to work with a number of singers and voice actors. When they tell me about some of the instructions and information they’ve been given, I never cease to be amazed by the lack of basic understanding exhibited by their vocal coaches. Admittedly, this impression comes entirely secondhand, but If I could send a message to all the voice trainers of the world it would be this:

Singing first and foremost is a breathing pattern. This breathing pattern consists of long, slow, supported, vibratory exhales, followed by short, quick, efficient inhales. The ability to do that breathing pattern must be the foundation for all vocal techniques, and if you are not training a singer’s body to efficiently execute that pattern, they will invariably have problems.

Perhaps the statements of this yoga teacher will be viewed as presumptuous by the voice community, but consider this: you do not need to be an expert in auto mechanics to know that the fanciest car will go nowhere without a functioning engine. Similarly, I do not need need to be schooled in vocal pedagogy to know that an efficiently operating breathing mechanism is quite literally the engine that makes singing possible.

Is the diaphragm important in this process? Of course it is, but the diaphragm is a muscle of inhaling, while singing is 90% exhaling. This means that the diaphragm is shortening its fibers only 10% of the time during most vocal phrasing. What, then do vocal coaches *really* mean when they tell a vocalist to “sing from your diaphragm?”

If you are a voice coach, and you can’t answer this question accurately, you need to educate yourself.

If you are a voice student reading this, and this is brand-new information to you, I would encourage you to show this article to your voice coach, see what they say, and if they have questions, please send them my way.  I’d love to have this conversation first-hand for a change.

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A return to being an anatomy student

What a privilege it’s been to spend this week back in the anatomy lab with the singular Gil Hedley and 35 outstanding, talented, accomplished fellow Somanauts.

Lydia and I came in on the third and final week of Gil’s unprecedented marathon teaching event during which he is recording on video and photographing never-before seen dissective technique and perspective for his upcoming “Atlas of Integral Anatomy.”

I always learn an enormous amount while spending time with Gil and the amazing people who show up in his lab.  This is my sixth time since 1997, but several participants and assistants have done far more than I.

Yesterday I had to leave early to teach my Yoga Anatomy course at The Breathing Project. Switching from student to teacher mode proved to be very energizing for me and I was jazzed to teach my own material in a way I haven’t been for quite a while.

Thank you, Gil.  And thank you especially to the essential generosity of the 8 donors whose forms grace our tables in the lab.  Please consider donating your body to science. I can tell you from personal experience as a student honored with access to such generosity, it’s a profound gift to your fellow man.

NJ Somanauts

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Tom Myers, Leslie Kaminoff & Amy Matthews teach NYC Symposium, Nov. 22-23

Spacious Feet is sold out

Tom Myers’ Anatomy Trains®,
Leslie Kaminoff’s Yoga Anatomy &
Amy Matthews’ Embodied Asana present

Spacious Feet:

The FOUNDATIONS of UNDER-STANDING
A weekend symposium in New York City
Sat-Sun, November 22-23, 2014, 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Helen Mills Event Space, 137-139 West 26th Street NYC
amy-leslie-tom-equation
Don’t miss this unique opportunity to learn from anatomy and movement pioneers Tom Myers, Leslie Kaminoff and Amy Matthews co-presenting a transformative weekend symposium.

Using lavishly illustrated lectures and movement explorations, this workshop is for anyone with feet, especially movement teachers and manual therapists of all kinds.

28 bones wrapped in a fascial bag, our uniquely human foot is a marvel of engineering – and it needs to be: such a tiny base of support under a tall and gangly skeleton with a high center of gravity.

Tiny changes in the position of our foot bones can make huge differences in functional ability and pain.  Learn to see proper positioning and response to guide your clients or students into dynamic, responsive feet that hold the body up easily and tread lightly on the planet.

WORKSHOP TOPICS INCLUDE:
spacious-feet-header

  • The essential arches of our feet
  • The ankle joints and body balance
  • The improbable heel and support for the back body
  • Slings and arch support: the calf muscles to the rescue
  • Responsive walking and the myofascial meridians — how we handle forces as we walk
  • Maintaining a pliable foot in an urban environment
Pricing:

$550 SOLD OUT!

Questions? Contact Leah for more information
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Fall tour recap, part 1: Toronto, ON

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I just finished a weekend workshop at the Yoga Sanctuary in Toronto, sponsored by new friends, Ashley and Bryon, who run Body Evolutions

One of the highlights was the opportunity to work with a young woman with a 75° thoracic c-curve scoliosis stabilized by Harrington rod surgery. We played with combining warrior stance with asymmetrical arm movements to identify the most unstable combination. By  varying the vector of her arm movements, she was able to activate long dormant muscles, helping to relieve some chronic pain under her right scapula.

It was very rewarding to help her discover how much rib cage movement she still had and experience freer breathing as a result. Lydia was able to snap some photos documenting her curve flattening out during this exploration.

All in all it was a fabulous weekend with a roomful of experienced teachers and studio owners. I look forward to returning to Toronto soon.

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More photos available on Flickr (photo credit: Lydia Mann) .

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Come on vacation with me!

L&K-Tulum-

If you’ve been reading these posts for a while you know I love to travel, love to teach and love a good party. I hope you’ll join me – along with Sadie Nardini and some of our closest friends – when we’ll get to do all those things at once!

We’ll be teaching at Maya Tulum during a weeklong retreat April 5-12, 2014. It’s not too soon to plan your next vacation, and it’s starting to fill up, so check it out:

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Yoga Therapy Summit in the Black Hills of South Dakota – Sept. 13-15

YT Summit
I am very excited and honored to be presenting alongside my esteemed colleagues and fellow students of the Krishnamacharya/Desikachar lineage at this unprecedented event.
I hope you can join us for this one-of-a-kind experience in this beautiful setting.
Check out the Facebook page.

For the occasion, I’ve created a brand-new presentation entitled: The Knot of Brahma – Emotional Suppression as the Source of Common Pain Syndromes.

Here is the description of the topic:
The ancient model of prana/apana samayogah as a definition of pranayama offers a simple, yet powerful model for how we can uncover and resolve the internal obstructions that result from a lifetime of managing our emotional “spaces.”
These ideas are especially important for Yoga Educators because there is mounting evidence that the most common pain syndromes suffered by vast numbers of people have their origins in the mind-body/psyche-soma mechanisms of emotional suppression.
In this wide-ranging lecture/demo, Leslie Kaminoff will review some of the latest research that supports this view, and he will relate it to the uniquely integrated teachings of breath-centered yoga practice within the tradition of T. Krishnamacharya.
For educators dedicated to working more deeply and effectively, these insights will be invaluable in the pursuit of reducing the “bad space” of dukha and increasing the “good space” of sukha.

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yogijbrown: Is Your Yoga Safe?

Another great piece from my friend J. Brown’s blog.  He’s given me permission to re-publish on e-Sutra anything I think my readers will enjoy, and I’m sure this qualifies.

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From J. Brown:

Infrequent visitors to the yoga blogosphere may not be aware of the recent kerfuffle surrounding a NY Times article about how yoga will hurt you, but there also has been some mainstream media coverage on the safety of yoga.

While the article seems to have broken a few glass jaws in the broader yoga community, practitioners with a therapeutic orientation have been sounding alarms about questionable practice for years and getting nothing but flak in return. Those with the courage to take a stand and level public criticism of overly aggressive and guitar-hero-like approaches are usually written off as haters who are just jealous of the cool kids with their feet on their heads.

I’m not going to address the article directly. This has been done well enough already by voices more qualified than mine (I recommend watching Leslie Kaminoff’s three-part video response.) But I am interested in people questioning what they are doing and whether or not it is safe, even if it is a byproduct of a sensationalistic and irresponsible ploy to sell books.

Unfortunately, the subsequent conversation has largely been dominated by a reach for easy answers that avoid deeper issues. More often than not, injuries in yoga are being attributed to a lack of proper alignment or understanding of anatomy. It is said either that practitioners are not doing the poses in a technically correct way or that their teachers are not educated enough about anatomy to instruct students how to do the poses in a technically correct way.

When it comes to alignment, I find it curious to notice teachers who are are usually quite rigid in their instruction are now bending over backwards to explain how they respond to the needs of students. Specifically, I was reading an excerpt from a new book, written by a senior teacher in a classical tradition, who was considering the instruction to “straighten your leg.”

Without referring to any particular poses, the author asserts that the instruction is a “very coarse truth [that] new students need to hear” and that the way to accommodate different capabilities is to offer different “levels of truth” in the form of more detailed directives (i.e. lift the quadriceps, resist with the calf muscle, root the three corners of the feet, etc.) The suggestion is that different students need different details as they develop the fully realized truth behind “straighten your leg.”

The problem is that finding different ways of articulating the same arbitrary configuration is not an example of how to adapt to the needs of students and certainly will not make the practice any safer for the large majority of people who benefit from bending their knees. The concept of “technically correct” is open to interpretation and much of what is considered proper alignment in the classical forms is contraindicated for huge portions of the population. Thus, it is possible to have perfect alignment and still hurt yourself.

For those who are inclined to rely on science, I have written a full length article for Yoga Therapy Today magazine entitled: Does Studying Anatomy Make Yoga Safer? In the piece, I ask several prominent anatomy for yoga teachers to weigh in on the role of studying anatomy and science in making yoga safe. What I think most people might find surprising is that even the experts in the field do not agree that anatomy is the key to ensuring safety in yoga.

As Neil Pearson, clinical assistant professor at the University of British Columbia and the chair of the Pain Science Division of the Canadian Physiotherapy Association, put it: “In the end, it is not Western scientific knowledge of the human body that will make Yoga safer. Changing the students approach to the discipline of yoga and the practice of asana will create the greatest shift.”

Instead of looking to alignment and anatomy as a panacea for what ails the yoga profession, perhaps we would do better to foster a different mentality around the physical work of yoga practice that minimizes any potential risks and encourages smarter choices.

Most of the professionals I have spoken to agree that the key to safe yoga boils down to the sensitivity and adaptability of the instructor, his or her capacity for dialogue with and responsiveness to a student, and the humble confidence of knowing what you know and what you don’t know.

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