An early thanks-giving

1987 Yoga Journal Magazine featuring Gary Kraftsow
September/October 1987 issue of Yoga Journal Magazine featuring a Life-Styles piece by David Frawley on Gary Kraftsow

Lately, I’ve been feeling tremendous gratitude for the way my life and work have turned out – even amidst a host of societal, political and environmental disasters – and I recently experienced a lovely bit of synchronicity that highlighted this.

I was seated onstage at the 2017 Yoga Therapy Summit telling the story of first becoming aware of T.K.V. Desikachar. Glancing down at the front row I saw Larry Payne, who I first met back in 1981, after he had returned from something of a guru-hopping tour of India. Back then, I remember asking him which teacher impressed him the most and the name he mentioned was the only one on his list I didn’t recognize: Desikachar. When I asked him what made this guy so special, all he could tell me was “It’s all in the breath.” This cryptic phrase struck me deeply and became a focal point for much of my curiosity about the role of breath in yoga for the next six years – and then I picked up the September/October 1987 issue of Yoga Journal. Here at the Yoga Therapy Summit seated beside Larry was Gary Kraftsow who – 30 years ago this month – was featured in that very issue of the magazine.

It was the cover, which featured Ken Wilber, that had attracted my attention. As hard as it is to believe – considering how asana imagery has so thoroughly permeated popular culture – back then, Yoga Journal went through a long stretch of 7 years and 40 issues (July 1983–March 1990) without a single asana photo on their front cover. Instead, the magazine featured all manner of new-age topics, trends and personalities. I had read Wilbur’s magnum opus “The Spectrum of Consciousness,” and was interested in what the “Einstein of consciousness” had to say. I really don’t remember, because I don’t think I ever got to the Wilbur article. Instead I was stopped in my tracks by a short, single-column “Life-Styles” article written by David Frawley about a yoga teacher named Gary Kraftsow he had encountered while teaching an Ayurveda program on Maui. It led with this: “Rather than focusing on the asanas as an end in themselves, he shows students how to apply yoga for their own unique physical structure and condition.” As it turns out, that small piece of writing would mark an essential turning point in my life and my yoga.

As I continued to read, more of Kraftsow’s perspective eerily echoed much of what I’d been thinking and teaching: “emphasizing function rather than form…individualizing practice to each student’s unique structure and condition…not to teach students where to go, but to show them how to get there…” Then I read: “Kraftsow began his yoga study with T.K.V. Desikachar in 1974…” and I felt a palpable jolt of recognition as my mind flashed back to the name Larry Payne had mentioned six years earlier. No wonder the words of a Desikachar student were striking such a chord – my own obsession with the role of breathing in asana had led me down a similar path!

Reading further, I learned that Desikachar was the son of T. Krishnamacharya, who Frawley described as “perhaps the most renowned yoga teacher of our time.” The article ended with Kraftsow saying, “Yoga refers primarily to the quality of action through which transformation can occur.”

So I was completely hooked. I knew — as clearly as I’d ever known anything — that I had to meet T.K.V. Desikachar.  The article said he lived in India, but didn’t specify where.

In the pre-internet, pre-Google age of analog information retrieval, my only resource was Gary Kraftsow’s phone number, helpfully provided at the bottom of the article. I left a message asking for more information about Gary, his programs, and the whereabouts of T.K.V.Desikachar. I heard back later that day from Mirka Kraftsow, who informed me that Desikachar lived in Madras, and that Gary would be presenting at an upcoming conference, Yoga and New Frontiers of Healing, at Murrieta Hot Springs in California. (This was my introduction to the group Unity in Yoga which later became the Yoga Alliance, but that’s another story!) Though I signed up for every class Gary was teaching, I cannot recall any of the specifics, but I do remember a powerful sense of connection with this tradition.

When people talk about finding their lineage or teacher, they frequently report a sense of “coming home.” I’m not sure if that’s how I would describe what I experienced, but I was clear that I’d stumbled on a line of inquiry focused on the same questions I’d been obsessed with ever since I started practicing and teaching:

  • How does the act of inhaling and exhaling relate to specific movements in asana practice?
  • How can the form of a pose be modified to serve its deeper function?
  • How can one teach these modifications in a group class?

I was relieved to realize: “I don’t have to keep re-inventing the wheel — there is a line of teachers who have been figuring this stuff out a lot longer than I have, and that lineage has a name – Viniyoga.”

At the conference, Gary told me about a program with Desikachar scheduled for that summer at Colgate University. That August of 1988 was when I first met Desikachar and became his student, although in reality he became my teacher the minute Larry quoted him saying: “it’s all in the breath.”

Three decades later, I am proud and humbled to be part of this amazing teaching community – each of us teaching in our own way – with a common core of inspiration: T.K.V. Desikachar and his father, T. Krishnamacharya. If we are lucky to live long enough, we get to thank the people who have been important to us. As I said onstage at the Summit, I am so very grateful to have this chance to publicly thank Larry and Gary for introducing me to these teachings.

2017 Yoga Therapy Summit, Chicago, IL (aka the Desikachar students’ old-timey reunion!)
Back row: Amy Wheeler, Gary Kraftsow, Kate Holcombe, Sonia Nelson, Chase Bossart, Laura Jane Mellencamp-Murphy, Clare Collins
Front row: Richard Miller, Leslie Kaminoff, JJ Gormley, Larry Payne, John Kepner
CREDIT: Lydia Mann
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Breathe Free: A Community Workshop Led by Leslie Kaminoff in New York City

Breathe Free October 7 / 3-5 PM / Flatiron District Unlock the power of breathwork to improve the quality of your life ​ Join us for a FREE Breathing WorkshopFor the first post-studio-closing event sponsored by The Breathing Project, we are joining forces with BreatheFreeNow to present a free workshop in New York City on Saturday October 7.  Below, you will find the description of the event. Come join us, and please forward this information to anyone who is interested in learning how to have healthier breathing.

People suffering from chronic conditions and debilitating ailments such as asthma, COPD and advanced restrictive lung disease can serve as inspiration: they remind us that there is nothing more fundamental than the breath.

In times of stress, even those with healthy lung function are prone to breath restriction. When this occurs, we can benefit from learning ways to find our way “home” to our natural breath. Simple techniques that link breath with healthy movement can help us become more grounded – more free –  in ways that reveal our inherent connection to the universal fabric that sustains us, and each other.

We can all benefit from guidance on how to better align ourselves with our breath. This event is an opportunity to practice breathing with greater awareness, clarity and strength.

BreatheFreeNow and The Breathing Project are pleased to present a FREE breathing workshop led by internationally recognized breathing and movement educator, Leslie Kaminoff from 3-5pm on Saturday October 7, 2017.  It will take place at HUB Seventeen, beneath the lululemon store on 114 5th Avenue (at 17th Street), New York, NY 10011.

WHAT TO EXPECT

  • We will explore fundamental breathing techniques, led by Leslie Kaminoff, with an emphasis on linking breath to simple movements, revealing individual breathing patterns and finding ways to free ourselves from habits that may not be serving us.
  • Attendees will learn key concepts about the anatomy of respiration, deepen awareness of their breath, and practice simple exercises they can continue practicing on their own.
  • The workshop will be accessible and adaptable for all experience levels.
  • Participants must be able to breathe unassisted, comfortable with basic physical movements, and be able to sit and stand independently.
  • No special equipment is needed but please wear loose, comfortable attire.

To learn more and register for the event, visit: https://www.breathefreenow.org/

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Spaces and Places

map of our upcoming travels

Transitioning out of the The Breathing Project’s physical space in July has required lots of moving, reconfiguring, and recalibrating.

For the first time in over 30 years, all my possessions are in the same zip code (10025). It’s a bit of a tight fit in our living space as I’ve accumulated three sets of almost everything: office supplies, clothing, bodywork equipment, books. Previously split between office, city home and country home, all my stuff has – quite literally – come home to roost. Much winnowing is required…it’s a process.

At the same time, my newly freed-up schedule has more space for travel and teaching. For the first time in 14 years I will not have to be in New York City every Wednesday during the scholastic year to teach my Yoga Anatomy courses, so we have been able to schedule more lengthy international teaching tours. Following our annual visit to one of my favorite places, North Carolina’s beautiful Asheville Yoga Center (September 16-17), and the Chicago edition of the Yoga Therapy Summit (September 30-October 1), Lydia and I will be off to Europe (the first of two visits this fall) for a 3-week tour:

  1. First week, we’ll be teaching at the Zen Center in Regensberg, Germany (October 14-15) for our new friend Tammy Bosler, who we met while teaching in Frankfurt in March.
  2. Next we’ll be returning to Madrid for our third time teaching for our good friends at Dhara Yoga (October 21-22).
  3. From there we are making our first visit to The Yoga Bank in Cheshire, England for a 4-day intensive (October 26-29).

We’ll be back stateside for a few weeks in November to rest up and a return visit to The Yoga Garden in Narberth, PA (November 4-5). For the first time in ages I will not be spending American Thanksgiving with my family: instead we will be returning to Europe to follow up last year’s sold-out workshops at Flow Yoga in Belfast (November 25-26) and CamYoga in Cambridge (December 1-4). Closing out the year, back in the US, we make our annual trek to Encinitas, CA and The Soul of Yoga (December 9-10). Phew!

Looking ahead to 2018 I’ll be spending my 60th birthday about as far away from home as possible: we’ll be in the Southern Hemisphere in the midst of a month-long teaching tour across New Zealand and Australia. I’ll be sharing more details about that trip in a future post.

So, as the start of my seventh decade approaches, I will be doing my best to focus on the theme that emerged this last month: “more space — less stuff.”

I’ll let you know how it goes.

more space, less stuff!

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Istanbul!

There’s such political turmoil in the world, and I admit I was a bit concerned about a trip to Istanbul, but now that we’ve arrived I’m thrilled. Later this week I’ll be teaching for Cihangir Yoga but for the next few days Lydia and I will be touring the city and enjoying this gorgeous view.

View of Topkapi Palace over the Bosphorus at dusk, shot from the Karaköy neighborhood

There are always challenges (see my Instagram of a mob waiting to go through John F. Kennedy Airport’s TSA last night) to the troubling state of our current government, but for now we’re loving this full moon rising over the Bosphorus.

Full moon rising over the Bosphorus

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Prequels to Beyond Anatomy: A Somatic Symposium, coming this weekend

We’re in the final preparations for this weekend’s Beyond Anatomy: A Somatic Symposium at my New York City studio, The Breathing Project, and I’ve realized I neglected to post links to three wonderful podcast interviews by Brooke Thomas of Liberated Body and an interview with Brette Popper on YogaCity NYC! Better late than never, here they are:

Pete Blackaby: “Whether we open fully to the world or shrink back from it will be dictated by the kind of world we have met, and the support, or lack of it, we feel we have had.”
Leslie Kaminoff: “Healing is different than curing or fixing.”
Amy Matthews: “The movement experience and the psychological experience are completely tied together. They are the same thing. They are indistinguishable.”
An interview by Brette Popper of YogaCityNYC with Leslie, Amy and Pete about the what’s and the why’s of Beyond Anatomy.

There are a few spaces left, Saturday and Sunday, April 1 and 2 from 9:00am-5:00pm. Register NOW to reserve your space!

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My busy fall teaching schedule has gotten underway

Gorgeous Northeastern colors along the PalisadesI love the fall, love the temperatures in the Northeast, and the colors, but mostly I love that my teaching schedule always kicks into high gear.

On Wednesday October 12 I’ll start my final year teaching Anatomy of Breath-Centered Yoga: Appendicular Body Focus at my New York City studio, The Breathing Project – a bittersweet occasion because I love this teaching and love the students and community we’ve built, but I am also filled with excitement about the opportunities for change and growth associated with closing the studio next summer.

Right after Wednesday’s class I’ll be heading to the airport to fly to Yoga Center of Minneapolis where I’ll present a four-day immersion focusing on breath and re-imagining alignment. We had a magnificent time at this beautiful studio last year and we’re eager to return.

Then we return to Yoga on High in Columbus, OH, for a workshop focused on the therapeutic aspects of Yoga. We’ll be doing some of my favorite things: a Hands-on Assisting Lab during which I’ll share teaching techniques developed over the past three decades of working therapeutically with groups and individuals.  Also scheduled is Case Studies and Clinical Analysis, which follows the format in which I observed my teacher, T.K.V. Desikachar, work one-on-one with clients.

In early November I’ll be going to Philadelphia to teach for the first time at the Yoga Garden Narberth, then onto Chattanooga, TN for another first-time visit, teaching A Breath Centered Approach to Alignment in Asana for the Yoga Landing on Warehouse Row.

To finish out my year in December I’ll be returning to one of my favorite haunts, Soul of Yoga, in Encinitas, CA. Each year I’ve taught there has provided an engaged group of teacher trainees. This year we’ll explore Yoga and The Respiratory System, covering the energetic phenomenon of breathing and how it occurs on every level – from cells to anatomical systems and beyond.

If you’re near any of these locations, or willing to take a little trip, I’d love to meet you in person so make sure to introduce yourself!

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I’m Not a Yoga Therapist Anymore (Revised)

REVISED, as of February 26, 2016!  Since I wrote this piece in 2008, the issues I raised in this article have become a hot topic of discussion – especially since the Yoga Alliance published its new guidelines regarding the use of the word “therapy” or “therapist” in its members’ profiles.  As a resource, they have linked to this post. Since a lot more people will be reading this as a result, I find it necessary to clarify how my thinking has changed on some points I make at the end of this post. You will find that I’ve struck through the section in which I propose that the appropriate place for the training of yoga educators is in academia.  I no longer hold this view.  Admittedly, back in 2008, I was a bit starry-eyed about the thought of universities embracing the idea of creating departments of yoga that would encourage interdisciplinary exchange around the training of yoga educators.  Since then, I’ve taken a deep dive into the possibilities of online education, where there is total freedom to create innovative and flexible curricula that serve the specific needs of the ever-growing yoga community.  As a result, I’ve realized that – just as we should avoid the bureaucracy of government regulation – we should avoid the increasingly virulent political correctness running rampant on most university campuses.Additionally, I no longer feel the need to salute the work of IAYT for their “enlightened stewardship of our field.”  Quite to the contrary, they have badly dropped the ball by promoting a standard for the education of yoga therapists without formulating a policy about regulation, or advising their membership on the legal scope of practice for yoga therapists.  IAYT’s abdication of their responsibility to provide leadership of the rapidly growing field of yoga therapy has left The Yoga Alliance with the task of framing and clarifying the discussion on Yoga Therapy.So, I stand by every word in the following piece, except for what has been struck out.  As always, please feel free to leave a comment to let me know what you think.

Leslie

This piece appeared in the 2008 (Volume 18) issue of “The International Journal of Yoga Therapy.” It was written at the request of the editor of the Journal, and is based on many discussions I’ve had with my IAYT colleagues over the  years.

As I enter my 30th year as a Yoga teacher, and the 25th year of full-time employment doing Yoga-based work with individuals, I’ve just recently figured out something that I consider to be vitally important: I no longer wish to be known as a “Yoga Therapist.”

This bit of clarity is largely due to the opportunity I’ve had to bounce ideas off my colleagues at IAYT and attendees at SYTAR, so it seems fitting to share this perspective in the pages of this journal. The process of producing a written summary based on repeated discussions with teachers, students, and friends is very familiar to me. It’s what I did 10 years ago when I started the email newslist e-Sutra with the following post:

I have been personally engaged in countless discussions [about standards for Yoga teachers and therapists] for at least the past seven years. In those seven years, my fundamental views about certification standards have not changed, although my arguments supporting those views have become simpler and clearer with each new discussion…I will now present to you what I hope will be a clear and persuasive overview of my position…

When I first wrote that, the topic was the establishment of national certification standards for Yoga teachers, which culminated in the birth of the Yoga Alliance. IAYT’s recent ongoing dialogue about the scope of practice and definition of Yoga Therapy is an extension of this debate. In my view, the fundamentals underlying both issues are identical, and can be summed up by the following question: “How can we define our professional activities in a way that preserves our freedom to conduct our relationships with our students in a manner that honors the core principles of Yoga?”

To fully explain my answer to this question, a little personal history will be necessary. Back in 1993, when the certification dialogue was just starting, I was serving as vice-president of a non-profit group called Unity in Yoga, and I was the principal author of the following official position statement:

We enthusiastically support the ongoing dialogue addressing higher personal, professional, and ethical standards for Yoga teachers and therapists. We are in support of a process that results in the establishment of Yoga as a respected personal and academic pursuit, and any certification or accreditation that may result.
We are, however, opposed to the establishment of any entity that assumes the authority to license or regulate Yoga teachers as professional practitioners and to enforce its standards on the Yoga community.

Against my objections, Unity in Yoga’s executive board decided to release only the first two sentences─an action I saw as a critical error. Shortly thereafter, I resigned from Unity in Yoga. Four years later, I witnessed another group of Yoga teachers make a similar error in collective judgment just before I resigned from the ad hoc committee that turned into the Yoga Alliance when it acquired Unity in Yoga’s non-profit status.

The error is this: It is not enough to say that you are supporting and establishing high standards for Yoga teacher training and certification. That’s the easy, obvious part. You must also state clearly, consistently, and defensibly what you are not supporting, on ethical grounds. Yoga ethics are very clear on this point. The teaching concerning what we should avoid (yama) is presented before the teachings about what we should pursue (niyama). Furthermore, the very first injunction is ahimsâ, the avoidance of doing harm. In the context of professional standards, what exactly must we avoid harming? The process of teaching Yoga. What is the vehicle for this process? The student-teacher relationship.

Therefore, the professional “yama” I adhere to is “I avoid engaging in any action that will lead to third-party interference in the student-teacher relationship.” My “niyama” is “I support and protect through my actions the sanctity, integrity, and freedom of the student-teacher relationship.”

Those statements are the core of my ethical and practical values as a practitioner, and it would be impossible for me to overstate their importance in my life. They reflect fundamental principles that tell me which actions to avoid, and which to pursue. Without consciously identifying those principles and validating their truth through my life’s experience, I could easily become lost and confused. My actions could proceed from fear and ignorance, and I could end up doing harm to myself, my students, and my profession.

The value of my original 1993 statement on standards has been repeatedly confirmed for me, and I continue to vigorously stand by it, with one exception. In the first sentence, I used the phrase “Yoga teachers and therapists.” I now realize that this phrase is redundant, confusing, and potentially harmful.

As the title of this piece implies, I am stating for the record that I no longer wish to known as a Yoga therapist. I have come to the conclusion that my continued use of the term would misrepresent the nature of my work, both to the public and to myself, and would violate the professional ethics I’ve outlined above.

This does not in any way mean that I intend to stop doing my job. In fact, I will be able to work far more effectively, having identified my actual job title: “Yoga educator.” In retrospect, I realize that from the moment I taught my first group âsana class until the present day, I’ve always had the same job. I’ve just been doing it more effectively by learning how to better tailor the teachings to individual needs. I used to unquestioningly assume that my education in anatomy, biomechanics, bodywork, physical rehabilitation, and philosophy granted me the right to call myself a therapist. But, in fact, it just turned me into a highly-educated Yoga teacher.

By understanding that a “Yoga therapist” is nothing more than a very good Yoga teacher, I can eliminate the troublesome word “therapy” from my job description. I no longer need to define what I do beyond stating that I educate people about how their bodies and minds can be more fully integrated through the use of breath, posture, and movement. Even when I employ touch as part of that process, it is only for the purpose of educating, not fixing.

Why is the word “therapy” troublesome? Let’s start with the dictionary. Judge for yourself which definition is closest to what we do:

Therapy (from the Greek therapeutikos, to attend or treat): treatment intended to relieve or heal a disorder; relating to the treatment of disease or disorders by remedial agents or methods…
Educate (from the Latin educere, to draw out): to train by formal instruction or supervised practice; to give intellectual, moral, and social instruction to someone; to provide information…

I submit that even the most highly skilled and experienced Yoga “Therapist” does not “treat disease…by remedial agents or methods.” This is the province of a medical system, whether it’s allopathic, naturopathic, or Ayurvedic. Yoga is not a medical system. Yoga is a set of principles that show us we are interconnected, multidimensional beings composed of body, breath, and mind. These teachings suggest strategies for identifying and reducing obstructions that can occur in any of these dimensions. When obstructions (klesha) are reduced, it is the human system itself that reestablishes a healthy balance. We simply show people how to make more space (sukha) in their bodies so prâna can flow more freely. It’s the body’s own resources that do the healing. In other words, the teacher doesn’t heal the student, the teachings do. This is my definition of Yoga therapy – it’s Yoga applied to the individual.

As Yoga educators, we must constantly remind ourselves of and preserve this essential truth by minding our yama and niyama.

We must not attempt to integrate ourselves into mainstream healthcare delivery by posing as a new therapeutic profession. Not only will this take us further from the truth of who we are, it will create destructive turf battles with established fields like physical therapy, massage therapy, dance therapy, and so on.

We must not seek third-party reimbursement (de facto regulation) for our services, which are very affordable compared to medical treatment. If we are concerned about under-served populations, we are free to charitably offer our skills to them. This will be vastly easier to do without health insurance bureaucrats dictating our rates while wasting our time filling out their paperwork.

Most importantly, we must not seek out or surrender to government control (licensing) over our precious and unique field. This would be a betrayal of our students, who have sought us out precisely because we are outside the mainstream. After all, Yoga is ultimately about freedom. How can we represent that freedom if we allow ourselves to be co-opted by an oppressive system?

How then do we reach all the patients and doctors within mainstream healthcare who desperately need our skills? My answer is that we already are.

All across the world, we Yoga educators are sharing our vital work in every area of healthcare delivery by virtue of what we do best: connecting with people. This sharing will only grow exponentially as more doctors, nurses, administrators, and business people become our students, transform their lives, and advocate on our behalf. If we continue to take a strong stand for our own freedom as educators, we can have nothing but a positive influence on everyone. This is especially true for those working and being treated within mainstream healthcare, whose freedoms have been severely eroded by the destructive aspects of a system that’s forgotten to honor above all else the practitioner-patient relationship.

Is some form of government regulation of our field inevitable? Perhaps we can’t avoid it forever, but consider this: would you rather be answerable to the authorities as a healthcare provider, or as an educator?

Lastly, committing ourselves to the educational/academic model reveals perhaps the most important area we should be pursuing: the institution of undergraduate and graduate Yoga training programs at the university level. There is no reason on earth why serious students shouldn’t be able to acquire bachelor’s, master’s or doctorate-level training in any and all aspects of Yoga. A university-based Yoga program would unite in an unprecedented way many existing departments: anatomy, kinesiology, physiology, anthropology, philosophy, psychology, religion, Sanskrit, to name just a handful. The majority of the necessary resources are already there. All that’s missing is a staff of experienced Yoga teachers to design and administer the Yoga training.

Think of what a valuable resource a full-blown Department of Yoga would be to a university! Students, teachers, and administrators in every department would benefit from the availability of ongoing, high-level, campus-based Yoga training. If we really want to be more accepted by doctors, there is no better way than to teach them Yoga while they’re still in medical school.

I guarantee that the first university with the vision to create a degree program in Yoga would be deluged by applications from highly motivated, deeply-committed students. It’s a cherished dream of mine to see this happen in my lifetime─perhaps soon enough for my younger sons to take advantage of it.

This brief piece does not permit me to explore all the implications of my view, and I am well aware there are a great many (including what the “T” in IAYT might be changed to). I sincerely hope a lively dialogue will emerge as you consider the possibility of re-identifying yourself as what you truly are: a Yoga educator. I’d love to hear from you.

In closing, I salute the leadership of IAYT for their enlightened stewardship of our field, and for their open-mindedness in allowing my ideas to appear in their journal. The fact that you are reading this is ample evidence of their commitment to a truly open dialogue, and I am deeply honored that they have welcomed me into this forum.

Leslie Kaminoff is the founder of the Breathing Project, a nonprofit educational corporation in New York City dedicated to the teaching of individualized, breath-centered Yoga practice. He is also the co-author of the book “Yoga Anatomy.”

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A theme for 2016: Asanas Don’t Have Alignment!

We are fresh back from Yoga Journal Live’s first event of 2016 – an annual gathering at the beautiful San Francisco Hyatt Embarcadero.  The students in my classes – and especially in my full-day Monday immersion were very receptive, engaged and enthusiastic about a major theme for 2016: Asanas Don’t Have Alignment – People Have Alignment.

Between now and March, I am teaching four weekend workshops that will “re-imagine alignment” from this provocative perspective, along with my other breath-centered topics:

February 13-14 we will be at Longwave Yoga in Wilmington, North Carolina, and the following weekend, February 20-21 will find us at Evenflow Yoga in Red Bank, New Jersey.

March 5-6 brings us to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania for a visit to the Om My Yoga Academy, and our much anticipated return visit with our friends at the InsideOut Fitness Co-op in Winter Haven Florida will be March 18-20.  If you or anyone you know is in the vicinity of these upcoming events we’d love to see you there!

To whet your appetite, I’ve attached below a classic excerpt from my anatomy course in which I share a few pointers about how to choose your priorities in building the foundations of alignment for any asana.

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2015 – It’s been a helluva year…

This map shows where I traveled in 2015
Lower numbers in the chart are as of December 12, and don’t reflect the days or mileage for our return trip to New York on December 15. The 39 cities on the chart are inflated since they count every time we returned home to New York. The actual number of cities we visited is 26.

Tonight in Paris, after finishing my last day of travel teaching for 2015, Lydia and I exhaled deeply and decided to map all our teaching travel for the year just ending.  Seeing it all in one image fills me with many emotions.

First and foremost, I feel gratitude for the fact that I can do what I do. When I took my first asana class at the New York Sivananda Center 1978, I could not have imagined how profoundly my life would be transformed. I wasn’t alone.  Over the last four decades so many others have been touched by Yoga, the world has turned into a place where someone like me – who is profoundly unemployable in any other field – can travel the globe sharing these teachings with the sincere, dedicated groups of lifelong learners we call Yoga Educators.

So – in tribute to this amazing year of teaching, travel, learning, and connecting – I am going to give a shout out to all the folks who made it possible for me to spend 127 days of 2015 journeying more than 90,000 miles* to 26 cities, seven countries, and meet close to 5,000 students in my classes and workshops. It has truly been an honor and privilege to spend time with the amazing students they gathered in their diverse spaces around the world:

  • Los Angeles, California – Larry Payne and his YogaRx Therapy training at LMU
  • Winter Haven, Florida – Kerry Wilson at Inside Out Fitness
  • Austin, Texas – Laura Forsyth and Lori McDougall at Yoga Yoga
  • McCall, Idaho– Debra Murphy at Shanti Yoga Studio
  • Sydney, Melbourne, Freehold, Australia – Michael de Manincor and Lisa Grauaug of Yoga Institute of Australia
  • New York, New York – Renee LaRose, Alden Conant and the entire team at YJLive! Conferences
  • Washington, D.C. – Rexx Samuell and his team at Buddha B. Yoga Studio
  • Lambertville, New Jersey – Sue Elkind, Denise Orloff and Caroline Joan Peixoto at Dig Yoga
  • Monroe, New York – Nicole Lewitan at Ananda Ashram
  • Glasgow, Scotland – Mark Russell of Kridaka Yoga
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota – Sarah Jane Wroblewski at the Yoga Center of Minneapolis (special shout-out to her wife Kim Bartmann for making us so welcome at a number of her retaurants)
  • New York, New York – Everyone at the Breathing Project and all the amazing students who showed up for my “Transformation Through Touch” summer immersion
  • Honolulu, Hawaii – Rich Girolami of Silk Bridge
  • Madrid, Spain –  Blanca San Roman of Dhara Yoga
  • Vienna, Austria – Florian Reitlinger and Brigit Pöltl at the Yoga Zentrum Mödling
  • Asheville, North Carolina – Stephanie Keach and Julia Albertson, Asheville Yoga Center
  • Milano, Italy – Giulia Borioli of the Milano Yoga Festival, and my translator Vittoria Frua
  • Encinitas, California – Monique Lonner of Soul of Yoga
  • Cologne, Germany – Sonia Bach and her team at the yogaloft Cologne
  • Paris, France – Alia M’Hamdi Bolt of AliaOM Yoga

We’re almost finished nailing down an equally exciting teaching schedule for 2016.  As soon as dates are confirmed, they will appear on my Calendar Page. I will be starting off the year with my first-ever appearance at the San Francisco YJLive! event and would love to see you there!

Finally, Lydia and I would like to send a special thank you to my agent, Ava Taylor and her amazing team at YAMA Talent. Ava is an amazing partner, a great friend and a true trailblazer in the field of professional management for yoga talent and event production. She also showed us a great time in Cologne, Germany (photo evidence below).

The fabulous Ava Taylor showing us a good time in Cologne.

* Lower numbers in the chart are as of December 12, and don’t reflect the days or mileage for our return trip to New York on December 15. The 39 cities on the chart are inflated since they count every time we returned home to New York. The actual number of cities we visited is 26.

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November in Italy, December in Cologne and Paris

Our trip to Italy has been quite wonderful so far, with stops in Venice and Florence before arriving today in Milan, where I’m about to start 4 days of teaching at their huge Yoga Festival.  I’m told that 6,000 people will pass through this event. That’s a lot bigger than any of the conferences I’ve been to in North America.

We will return to Europe one more time before the end of the year for workshops in Cologne and Paris next month. Each of these events is very special. I am very much looking forward to meeting up with the yogaloft Cologne’s founder, Sonia Bach and her lovely wife, my talent agent Ava Taylor – both of whom have promised us a whirlwind tour of Cologne.  In Paris, I can hardly contain my excitement about meeting and presenting with Blandine Calais-Germain – someone who has inspired me for years with her brilliant books on anatomy and movement.

If you’re anywhere in the vicinity next month, come join us!

Leslie Kaminoff at the yogaloft
Leslie Kaminoff at Alia Om Yoga

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