Meet the “Beyond Anatomy” presenters: Pete Blackaby, Amy Matthews, Leslie Kaminoff, interviewed by Brooke Thomas

The wonderful Brooke Thomas, creator of The Liberated Body podcast, will moderate our upcoming Breathing Project symposium “Beyond Anatomy” in New York City April 1 & 2.

In this special episode which kicks off the fourth season of her podcast, Brooke asks Peter Blackaby, Amy Matthews and me what “Beyond Anatomy” means to us. I’m sure you’ll find our responses thought-provoking, and hope they’ll inspire you to join us at the Symposium.

We already have people coming from across the country, and even across the pond (Pete has lots of fans in his home country, Britain, and throughout the UK), so sign up while there’s still space. We look forward to seeing you there!

“Who knows?…It may do something good.”

My upcoming weekend workshop at Yoga on High in Columbus, Ohio will focus on the healing potentials of Yoga. Whenever I teach this topic, I like to play a section of a 1996 documentary I helped produce in which my late teacher T.K.V. Desikachar talks about students who showed up at the Krishnamacharya Yoga Mandiram seeking help.  His simple words express very beautifully the essence of how yoga can help:

“The most important problem is suffering…but for some reason, the usual system of medical and health care is not able to understand the person who is suffering. They know a lot about the problem..but the relationship between this illness and the person is not so much emphasized. It’s not just illness, it’s what I call ‘the relationship to the illness’.  So, when the person goes to all these (medical) people, and still they are not better, they become desperate.

“We talk to these people. We say: ‘You have some resources which are not just medicine.  There’s something you have: you can still breathe…you can still talk…you  can sit and move. That means you still have the energy that can heal you. Let us direct and use this energy…who knows? It may do something good.’”

In my practice, this principle has evolved into a quick checklist for new students: “Are they breathing?  Are they able to focus their attention?  Can they move their body voluntarily?”  If the answers are even a little bit of yes, then they can practice yoga and reap immediate benefits. It is my contention that the most profound healing derived from yoga practice comes from the simplest things we teach, not the most complex.  The first, simplest thing that we ask people to do is also the most powerful: bringing the body and mind together through the medium of the breath.

I’ve provided a more extensive quote of Desikachar’s ideas about healing and the student-teacher relationship for Yoga on High’s blog, and the complete piece was a chapter in the book “Yoga Therapy and Integrative Medicine: Where Ancient Science Meets Modern Medicine” by Larry Payne Ph.D., Terra Gold M.A.LAc. and Eden Goldman D.C.

yoga-on-high-logoIf you’re available and can get to Yoga on High in Columbus, Ohio October 21-23, please come join me as we explore some of the therapeutic applications of yoga.

Breath-Centered Yoga Therapeutics: A Four Day Immersion in Southern California

YATMI’m excited about my upcoming return to Laguna Niguel’s beautiful You and the Mat studio for a four day immersion in my favorite topic: Breath-Centered Therapeutics. The 4- day series of workshops take place from May 20-23, and will feature a clinical observation day.

Sunday’s session will be Respiratory Yoga Therapeutics: Clinical Observation – offering a rare glimpse into what happens in a private therapeutic yoga session. Through observation, questions, discussion and exchange I will demonstrate the principles of how to customize yoga practices, read the body to identify patterns of holding and tension, offer hands-on assists from an anatomically-informed breath-centered perspective, and explore yoga philosophy with anatomical understanding of the human system.

Three guest clients will have a unique opportunity to work one-on-one with me on specific respiratory issues to build awareness of their particular pattern of holding tension and receive support and encouragement from a group of people interested in their wellness.

I’m inviting you to help us find great clinic guests.

Do you have a challenging client or student or know someone (even yourself!) who could use this kind of breathing help? The person need not be a yoga practitioner, but should be experiencing some kind of breathing disorder or challenge. The time commitment is 1-2 hours on Sunday May 22, 2016.

Please invite anyone you think is appropriate to complete a clinic guest intake form. The deadline for submission is Sunday May 15 at midnight. We will be emailing all who have submitted an application by Tuesday May 17 informing them whether they are on the schedule.

Help us get the word out!   Thanks.

Breath Education Myth #3 — "Habitual Breath-Holding is Harmless"

Excitement is growing here at The Breathing Project for our upcoming symposium Breath Education: Art, Science & Soul on the weekend of October 24-25.  We anticipate a sell-out, so sign up soon if you want to attend!

For our third installment of breath myth-busting, we hear from presenters Lynn Martin and Jessica Wolf – two of the country’s most experienced breath educators – who weigh in on the subject of breath-holding.

MYTH: “habitual breath-holding is harmless.”

Lynn Martin
Jessica Wolf

There is nothing positive to be said about habitual breath-holding. It is often an involuntary response to a moment of anxiety or stress. Many of us hold our breaths when we are trying to think of the best verbal response to a challenge, or the correct answer to a question that has been posed. But there is no perceivable benefit to doing that. If one needs a pause to think before speaking, it would be more productive to continue the flow of air into and out of the lungs while pondering the situation, thereby increasing the possibility of oxygen renewal to the brain.

Breath-holding interrupts the synergy and organization of the neuro-musculo-skeletal coordination that keeps the breathing process moving freely and fluidly. Breath-holding brings the diaphragm and all of the respiratory muscles to a sudden halt. It builds up unnecessary pressure in the thorax and in the throat, also interfering with the potential oscillation of the vocal folds as they prepare for the next spoken utterance.

Our teacher, Carl Stough, coached competing swimmers not to hold the breath while swimming under water. He suggested that the swimmer should first inhale and then extend the exhalation phase for the duration of time that the head is submerged, surface for the next inhalation, then exhale again under water, thus keeping the continuity of breathing movement.

Breath Education Myth #2 – "Deep Breathing is Always Better"

As promised, here’s our next breath “mythbusting” contribution courtesy of my esteemed colleague and co-presenter Amy Matthews

MYTH: “Deep breathing is always better.”

It is NOT true that we should always breathe as deeply as we possibly can. There is not one single ‘right way’ to breathe, and the most effective breath is the one that is most suited to that person, in that moment.

Sometimes a shallow breath is the most effective choice – in biological systems the qualities of being deepest, longest and biggest are not necessarily indicators of success. Success arises from being effective . . . just good enough. So taking a deeper breath than we need might literally be a waste of time and energy.

Instead of always going for deeper and stronger breaths, can we instead cultivate adaptability and responsiveness?

Our October 24 & 25 symposium is filling up fast, so be sure to register now!

Breath Education Myth #1 – Diaphragmatic vs. …?

Lung Tree Early Bird
Our amazing symposium “Breath Education — Art Science and Soul” is starting to fill up.  Don’t miss your last chance to attend at the early registration rate, which expires in one day (Sept 12).

As a lead-up to the event, our presenters will share their favorite breath education myths, which they will debunk at the event.  For me, myth #1 is probably the most pervasive one in the field: the term diaphragmatic breathing itself. If I had my way, I’d completely banish the term from breath education.

ALL breathing is diaphragmatic.  No living person should ever be told that they aren’t using their diaphragm unless they suffer from paralysis (and in that case, why would you say it to them in the first place? — they already know).

The term “diaphragmatic breathing” is as redundant and silly as the term “foot walking.”  When that term gets used, it’s intended to distinguish healthy breathing (diaphragmatic) from some other pattern an educator has judged to be unhealthy, but it would be absurd to say the unhealthy pattern is “non-diaphragmatic.”  The real issue isn’t whether the diaphragm is working or not, it’s whether it is able to work to its full efficiency without undue obstruction.

For a fuller explanation, and SO MUCH more, sign up now for “Breath Education — Art Science and Soul” at The Breathing Project!

Join me for a symposium: Breath Education: Art, Science & Soul

lung-tree_422-v2Ten years ago, I produced a weekend symposium for Kripalu called “The Future of Breathing.” To celebrate the anniversary of that wonderful event, I’ve put together a lineup of friends and esteemed breathing experts who will join me at The Breathing Project in October.
Event details are below and early discounted registration is now open. There is limited space at this intimate event, so sign up soon! Future e-Sutra posts will feature interviews with all of the presenters.

Saturday & Sunday, October 24–25, 2015, 9:30am – 5:00pm

The Art of Breathing Coordination and the Kinesthetic Voice
with Jessica Wolf & Lynn Martin

The Physiology of Healthy Breathing
with Dr. Robert Fried

An Embodied Inquiry into Internal Respiration
with Amy Matthews

Essentials of Diaphragmatic Biomechanics
with Leslie Kaminoff

IS THIS SYMPOSIUM FOR YOU?

  • Do you teach or coach voice, acting, yoga, movement or fitness?
  • Do you work in a therapeutic context as a bodyworker, physical therapist, respiratory therapist or trauma therapist?
  • Do you engage with breathing as part of your therapeutic, teaching or personal practice?
  • Are you interested in what’s going on in related fields and modalities on the topic of breath?
  • Are you curious about where flawed assumptions, inaccurate anatomy and limited perspectives might be affecting your choices?

Join us for a special weekend symposium on breath education where we’ll dive into an expansive and inclusive inquiry into working with people and their breath. Leslie Kaminoff has gathered fellow practitioners and innovators from multiple disciplines who, like himself, are deeply engaged in questions around breathing and embodiment. Each presenter will present and share about what they’re curious and passionate about in the realm of breathing. The weekend will include lecture, interactive sessions, experiential learning, movement explorations and opportunities for Q&A.

The Art of Breathing Coordination and the Kinesthetic Voice
with Jessica Wolf & Lynn Martin

Join Jessica and Lynn as they co-present the following topics:

  • Introduction to Breathing Coordination
  • Animated film created by Jessica Wolf
  • Common misconceptions about breathing
  • Guided practices to enhance awareness of body, breath and voice
  • Development of kinesthetic voice related practices

lynn-martinLynn Martin teaches functional anatomy, Ideokinesis and Breathing Coordination at New York University, in the Tisch Dance Department, Tisch School of the Arts. Lynn has studied functional anatomy and Ideokinesis extensively with Irene Dowd, who teaches at The Juilliard School and who studied there with Dr. Lulu Sweigard.

For many years, Lynn Martin also studied Breathing Coordination with Carl Stough. As a member of the Board of Directors, she worked with The Stough Institute on special educational projects and was Associate Producer of a documentary video, Breathing: The Source of Life.

Her background also includes studies in AfroCaribbean music and dance with Montego Joe, Pamela Patrick, Pat Hall, Jean-Léon Destiné and Serge St. Juste. She studied voice with Conrad L. Osborne and has sung much of the great choral-orchestral repertoire with The Cecilia Chorus of N.Y. at Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center.

A summa cum laude graduate of Fordham University, Lynn has also taught at the Laban/Bartenieff Institute of Movement Studies, the Westchester Conservatory of Music, Brooklyn College, the National Association of Teachers of Singing and the Alvin Ailey American Dance Center. She maintains a private practice in Ideokinesis and Breathing Coordination and teaches workshops in New York City and Switzerland.

jessica-wolfJessica Wolf, M.AmSAT, is an internationally recognized teacher of the Alexander Technique. She completed her training at the American Center for the Alexander Technique in 1977 and is one of the few Alexander professionals who have been teaching for more than 35 years. Throughout her career, she has explored and conducted research in respiratory function.

In 1998, Jessica established the Alexander Technique program at Yale School of Drama, where she now holds the position of Associate Professor. In 2002, she became the founder and director of the first post-graduate training program for Alexander teachers in “Jessica Wolf’s Art of Breathing.” She has certified 60 Alexander teachers around the world. Other faculty appointments include the Aspen Music Festival, The Juilliard School, SUNY Purchase, Circle in the Square Theater School, Hunter College, Sarah Lawrence College, and the Verbier Music Festival.

Jessica created the first three-dimensional animated film of the respiratory system and published Jessica Wolf’s Art of Breathing: Collected Articles in 2013. She coaches many performing artists who appear on and off Broadway, as well as in film and television. Jessica travels extensively giving workshops to performers and health care providers.

The Physiology of Healthy Breathing
with Dr. Robert Fried

Dr. Fried will help us to define healthy breathing in terms of its physiological characteristics. He will explain and demonstrate the basic instrumentation for monitoring the measurable parameters of lung and blood gases, and heart rate variability. With the insights provided by such monitoring, Dr. Fried will show how it’s possible to identify common patterns of breathing that could adversely alter respiratory function, and reveal the adverse consequences of abnormal lung and blood gases on a variety of physical conditions ranging from heart and kidney ailments to anxiety and hypertension.

robert-friedRobert Fried, Ph.D., is Emeritus Professor, Doctoral Faculty in Behavioral Neuroscience, City University of New York (CUNY) and Emeritus, American Physiology Society (APS) (Cardiovascular and Respiration Div.), and world-renowned expert in the treatment of stress and anxiety.

He is the author of The Arginine SolutionThe Hyperventilation Syndrome, and The Breath Connection, and is former Director of the Stress and Biofeedback Clinic of the Ellis Institute for Rational Emotive Therapy in New York City, where he lives.

An Embodied Inquiry into Internal Respiration
with Amy Matthews

Amy will explore the movement of the breath after it enters the lungs, as it travels through blood to its final destination in the cells. This journey of internal respiration can be explored in relationship to any pattern of external breathing.

Embodying the processes of internal respiration can be a way to expand the experience of breathing from the landmarks of external respiration (thorax, lungs, ribcage and diaphragm) into an experience of breathing in every tissue of our body. We can also use this full body experience of our breath as a foundation for the exploration of a wide variety of specific approaches to breathing, and as a way to ground and orient our sense of self.

amy-matthewsAmy Matthews, CMA, IDME, BMC Teacher, RSMT/RSME has been teaching movement since 1994. She is a Certified Laban Movement Analyst, a Body-Mind Centering® Teacher, an Infant Developmental Movement Educator, and a yoga therapist and yoga teacher.

Amy co-authored with Leslie Kaminoff the best-selling book Yoga Anatomy, and together Amy and Leslie co-direct The Breathing Project, a non-profit educational institution in NYC.

Amy directs the BMC® & Yoga programs in NYC and Portland, OR for the School for Body-Mind Centering, and was on the faculty of the Laban/Bartenieff Institute of Movement Studies for 10 years. She teaches embodied anatomy and movement in the USA and internationally.

Essentials of Diaphragmatic Biomechanics
with Leslie Kaminoff

Leslie will provide an in-depth look at the structure and function of the diaphragm from a unique perspective – its oft-neglected role as a muscle of postural support. With so much popular attention being paid to the concept of “core support,” there is actually a dearth of well-defined, functional definitions of “core” that take into account the enormously powerful role the diaphragm plays in modulating our relationship to gravity. Through audio-visual presentations, kinesthetic and experiential exploration, and dynamic interaction, Leslie will lead participants in a transformative journey into their breathing, thinking bodies.

leslie-kaminoffLeslie Kaminoff is a yoga educator inspired by the tradition of T.K.V. Desikachar. For over three decades he has led workshops and developed specialized education in the fields of yoga, breath anatomy and bodywork. His approach to teaching combines intellectual rigor, spontaneity and humor, and is always evolving.

Leslie is the founder of The Breathing Project, a New York City based educational non-profit dedicated to teaching individualized, breath-centered yoga. His unique year-long yoga anatomy courses are now available online at yogaanatomy.net. He is the co-author, with Amy Matthews, of the best-selling book Yoga Anatomy.

SCHEDULE

Saturday & Sunday
October 24 – 25, 2015
9:30am – 5:00pm

LOCATION

The Breathing Project
15 West 26th Street, 10th Floor
New York, NY 10010
Directions

REGISTRATION

$375 early price/$350 TBP Members before Sep 12
$425 full price/$400 TBP Members

Email us at  with questions or for more info.




*  *  *

Cancellation Policies

  • Up to 2 weeks before – REFUND. Deposit will be refunded, minus a $30 processing fee.
  • Up to 7 days before – CREDIT. Deposit minus a $30 processing fee may be transferred to another workshop or course at The Breathing Project.
  • Less than 7 days before – No refunds or credits.
  • Transfer between in-person and online courses is not allowed.

"Singing from the Diaphragm" – An open letter to the world of voice training

Leslie works with Della on diaphragm release.I’ve had the opportunity lately to work with a number of singers and voice actors. When they tell me about some of the instructions and information they’ve been given, I never cease to be amazed by the lack of basic understanding exhibited by their vocal coaches. Admittedly, this impression comes entirely secondhand, but If I could send a message to all the voice trainers of the world it would be this:

Singing first and foremost is a breathing pattern. This breathing pattern consists of long, slow, supported, vibratory exhales, followed by short, quick, efficient inhales. The ability to do that breathing pattern must be the foundation for all vocal techniques, and if you are not training a singer’s body to efficiently execute that pattern, they will invariably have problems.

Perhaps the statements of this yoga teacher will be viewed as presumptuous by the voice community, but consider this: you do not need to be an expert in auto mechanics to know that the fanciest car will go nowhere without a functioning engine. Similarly, I do not need need to be schooled in vocal pedagogy to know that an efficiently operating breathing mechanism is quite literally the engine that makes singing possible.

Is the diaphragm important in this process? Of course it is, but the diaphragm is a muscle of inhaling, while singing is 90% exhaling. This means that the diaphragm is shortening its fibers only 10% of the time during most vocal phrasing. What, then do vocal coaches *really* mean when they tell a vocalist to “sing from your diaphragm?”

If you are a voice coach, and you can’t answer this question accurately, you need to educate yourself.

If you are a voice student reading this, and this is brand-new information to you, I would encourage you to show this article to your voice coach, see what they say, and if they have questions, please send them my way.  I’d love to have this conversation first-hand for a change.

A return to being an anatomy student

What a privilege it’s been to spend this week back in the anatomy lab with the singular Gil Hedley and 35 outstanding, talented, accomplished fellow Somanauts.

Lydia and I came in on the third and final week of Gil’s unprecedented marathon teaching event during which he is recording on video and photographing never-before seen dissective technique and perspective for his upcoming “Atlas of Integral Anatomy.”

I always learn an enormous amount while spending time with Gil and the amazing people who show up in his lab.  This is my sixth time since 1997, but several participants and assistants have done far more than I.

Yesterday I had to leave early to teach my Yoga Anatomy course at The Breathing Project. Switching from student to teacher mode proved to be very energizing for me and I was jazzed to teach my own material in a way I haven’t been for quite a while.

Thank you, Gil.  And thank you especially to the essential generosity of the 8 donors whose forms grace our tables in the lab.  Please consider donating your body to science. I can tell you from personal experience as a student honored with access to such generosity, it’s a profound gift to your fellow man.

NJ Somanauts

Tom Myers, Leslie Kaminoff & Amy Matthews teach NYC Symposium, Nov. 22-23

Spacious Feet is sold out

Tom Myers’ Anatomy Trains®,
Leslie Kaminoff’s Yoga Anatomy &
Amy Matthews’ Embodied Asana present

Spacious Feet:

The FOUNDATIONS of UNDER-STANDING
A weekend symposium in New York City
Sat-Sun, November 22-23, 2014, 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Helen Mills Event Space, 137-139 West 26th Street NYC
amy-leslie-tom-equation
Don’t miss this unique opportunity to learn from anatomy and movement pioneers Tom Myers, Leslie Kaminoff and Amy Matthews co-presenting a transformative weekend symposium.

Using lavishly illustrated lectures and movement explorations, this workshop is for anyone with feet, especially movement teachers and manual therapists of all kinds.

28 bones wrapped in a fascial bag, our uniquely human foot is a marvel of engineering – and it needs to be: such a tiny base of support under a tall and gangly skeleton with a high center of gravity.

Tiny changes in the position of our foot bones can make huge differences in functional ability and pain.  Learn to see proper positioning and response to guide your clients or students into dynamic, responsive feet that hold the body up easily and tread lightly on the planet.

WORKSHOP TOPICS INCLUDE:
spacious-feet-header

  • The essential arches of our feet
  • The ankle joints and body balance
  • The improbable heel and support for the back body
  • Slings and arch support: the calf muscles to the rescue
  • Responsive walking and the myofascial meridians — how we handle forces as we walk
  • Maintaining a pliable foot in an urban environment
Pricing:

$550 SOLD OUT!

Questions? Contact Leah for more information